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Category Archives: Federal Law

Intellectual Property Theft : Chopping off Creativity

Innovation and creation have to be financed; like everyone else, the people innovating and creating have to make a living. Large amounts of time and money can be spent on researching and developing new technologies and products without any guarantee that these will be rewarded, as there is always a risk that a product will not be successful. Intellectual property rights are a mechanism that allows innovators, creators and producers to finance their work through the market place. Other models of  financing exist, such as government funding or private patronage, but intellectual property rights  (IPRs) remain the basis most frequently used by individuals and organizations to fund and disseminate their work. Intellectual property rights allow creative freedom and encourage innovators and creators to be responsive to consumer needs.

But what happens when these rights are not able to save your creativity! The end result is that there is nothing that we can stop Intellectual property theft unless we stop ourselves from using pirated stuff! But then there’s another angle to it as well. We all have heard that “There is no such thing as free lunch in this world.” So whenever we get a chance to use FOKAT KA MAAL 😛 😛 nothing can stop us! Even I do the same and I’m sure all of us do the same! 😉

As an example, Five years and five months after it started probing the sensational theft of Rabindranath Tagore’s Nobel medallion and other memorabilia from Rabindra Bhavan museum at Visva Bharati University in Santiniketan, the CBI called off its investigation. In a letter to Registrar of the University Manimukut Mitra on August 20, the CBI SP (Special Crime Branch), Kolkata, said that it was closing the probe just because of a dearth of clues. Although this decesion of CBI was criticized a lot and it should be. After all Tagore was one of the greatest poets we had! 😡

Now lets take a look at the IT sphere. IT practitioners stand to lose from pirating of software in a number of ways. The first disadvantage is simply that this practice significantly contributes to the lack of appreciation for the true cost of computer software. For individuals wishing to become independent  software developers, this lack of appreciation ensures that the perceived value of computer software that they develop will generally be a fraction of the true value rendering software development a less than satisfactory economic and business pursuit. In the case of IT staff employed by public and private sector organisations, the value of the assets entrusted to their care is again not truly appreciated, and it seems not to be realised by those very IT practitioners that this lack of appreciation for the true cost of information systems impacts in a very real way on their careers.  Consider a typical medium sized organisation with a network of 30-40 machines running a standard set of applications, accounting, payroll, etc.

How businesses are affected?

Businesses are less likely to transfer advanced technology, or invest in production or R&D facilities in countries where they are likely to have their products copied or technology stolen. This is particularly true of industries where intellectual property plays a key role, such as the IT, biotechnology and pharmaceutical sectors, which many countries aspire to develop.In short, the economy stagnates.An analysis of international trade data suggests that up to $ 200 billion of internationally traded products could have been counterfeit or pirated in 2005. This amount is larger than the national GDPs of about 150 economies! The figure does not include non-tangible pirated digital products being distributed via the internet. If these items were added, says The Economic Impact of Counterfeiting and Piracy study published by the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development in 2007, “the total magnitude of counterfeiting and piracy worldwide could well be several hundred billion dollars more.” Now thats worth giving a thought to.

Please tell how the post is. Do share if you like it and additions are always welcome. 🙂

Innovation and creation have to be financed; like everyone else, the people innovating and creating
have to make a living. Large amounts of time and money can be spent on researching and developing
new technologies and products without any guarantee that these will be rewarded, as there is always a
risk that a product will not be successful. Intellectual property rights are a mechanism that allows
innovators, creators and producers to finance their work through the market place. Other models of
financing exist, such as government funding or private patronage, but intellectual property rights
(IPRs) remain the basis most frequently used by individuals and organizations to fund and disseminate
their work. Intellectual property rights allow creative freedom and encourage innovators and creators
to be responsive to consumer needs.
But what happens when these rights are not able to save your creativity! The end result is that there is
nothing that we can stop Intellectual property theft unless we stop ourselves from using pirated stuff!
But then there’s another angle to it as well. We all have heard that “There is no such thing as free
lunch in this world.” So whenever we get a chance to use FOKAT KA MAAL 😛 😛 nothing can stop us!
Even I do the same and I’m sure all of us do the same! 😉
As an example, Five years and five months after it started probing the sensational theft of
Rabindranath Tagore’s Nobel medallion and other memorabilia from Rabindra Bhavan museum at Visva
Bharati University in Santiniketan, the CBI called off its investigation. In a letter to Registrar of the
University Manimukut Mitra on August 20, the CBI SP (Special Crime Branch), Kolkata, said that it was
closing the probe just because of a dearth of clues. Although this decesion of CBI was criticized a lot
and it should be. After all Tagore was one of the greatest poets we had! 😡
Now lets take a look at the IT sphere. IT practitioners stand to lose from pirating of software in a
number of ways. The first disadvantage is simply that this practice significantly contributes to the lack
of appreciation for the true cost of computer software. For individuals wishing to become independent
software developers, this lack of appreciation ensures that the perceived value of computer software
that they develop will generally be a fraction of the true value rendering software development a less
than satisfactory economic and business pursuit. In the case of IT staff employed by public and private
sector organisations, the value of the assets entrusted to their care is again not truly appreciated, and
it seems not to be realised by those very IT practitioners that this lack of appreciation for the true cost
of information systems impacts in a very real way on their careers.  Consider a typical medium sized
organisation with a network of 30-40 machines running a standard set of applications, accounting,
payroll, etc.
How businesses are affected?
Businesses are less likely to transfer advanced technology, or invest in production or R&D facilities in
countries where they are likely to have their products copied or technology stolen. This is particularly
true of industries where intellectual property plays a key role, such as the IT, biotechnology and
pharmaceutical sectors, which many countries aspire to develop.In short, the economy stagnates.An
analysis of international trade data suggests that up to $ 200 billion of internationally traded products
could have been counterfeit or pirated in 2005. This amount is larger than the national GDPs of about
150 economies! The figure does not include non-tangible pirated digital products being distributed via
the internet. If these items were added, says The Economic Impact of Counterfeiting and Piracy study
published by the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development in 2007, “the total
magnitude of counterfeiting and piracy worldwide could well be several hundred billion dollars more.”
Now thats worth giving a thought to.
Please tell how the post is. Do share if you like it and additions are always welcome. :Innovation and creation have to be financed; like everyone else, the people innovating and creating
have to make a living. Large amounts of time and money can be spent on researching and developing
new technologies and products without any guarantee that these will be rewarded, as there is always a
risk that a product will not be successful. Intellectual property rights are a mechanism that allows
innovators, creators and producers to finance their work through the market place. Other models of
financing exist, such as government funding or private patronage, but intellectual property rights
(IPRs) remain the basis most frequently used by individuals and organizations to fund and disseminate
their work. Intellectual property rights allow creative freedom and encourage innovators and creators
to be responsive to consumer needs.
But what happens when these rights are not able to save your creativity! The end result is that there is
nothing that we can stop Intellectual property theft unless we stop ourselves from using pirated stuff!
But then there’s another angle to it as well. We all have heard that “There is no such thing as free
lunch in this world.” So whenever we get a chance to use FOKAT KA MAAL 😛 😛 nothing can stop us!
Even I do the same and I’m sure all of us do the same! 😉
As an example, Five years and five months after it started probing the sensational theft of
Rabindranath Tagore’s Nobel medallion and other memorabilia from Rabindra Bhavan museum at Visva
Bharati University in Santiniketan, the CBI called off its investigation. In a letter to Registrar of the
University Manimukut Mitra on August 20, the CBI SP (Special Crime Branch), Kolkata, said that it was
closing the probe just because of a dearth of clues. Although this decesion of CBI was criticized a lot
and it should be. After all Tagore was one of the greatest poets we had! 😡
Now lets take a look at the IT sphere. IT practitioners stand to lose from pirating of software in a
number of ways. The first disadvantage is simply that this practice significantly contributes to the lack
of appreciation for the true cost of computer software. For individuals wishing to become independent
software developers, this lack of appreciation ensures that the perceived value of computer software
that they develop will generally be a fraction of the true value rendering software development a less
than satisfactory economic and business pursuit. In the case of IT staff employed by public and private
sector organisations, the value of the assets entrusted to their care is again not truly appreciated, and
it seems not to be realised by those very IT practitioners that this lack of appreciation for the true cost
of information systems impacts in a very real way on their careers.  Consider a typical medium sized
organisation with a network of 30-40 machines running a standard set of applications, accounting,
payroll, etc.
How businesses are affected?
Businesses are less likely to transfer advanced technology, or invest in production or R&D facilities in
countries where they are likely to have their products copied or technology stolen. This is particularly
true of industries where intellectual property plays a key role, such as the IT, biotechnology and
pharmaceutical sectors, which many countries aspire to develop.In short, the economy stagnates.An
analysis of international trade data suggests that up to $ 200 billion of internationally traded products
could have been counterfeit or pirated in 2005. This amount is larger than the national GDPs of about
150 economies! The figure does not include non-tangible pirated digital products being distributed via
the internet. If these items were added, says The Economic Impact of Counterfeiting and Piracy study
published by the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development in 2007, “the total
magnitude of counterfeiting and piracy worldwide could well be several hundred billion dollars more.”
Now thats worth giving a thought to.
Please tell how the post is. Do share if you like it and additions are always welcome. 🙂
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Posted by on September 13, 2009 in Business, Concerns, Copyright, Economy, Federal Law

 

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