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Intellectual Property Theft : Chopping off Creativity

13 Sep

Innovation and creation have to be financed; like everyone else, the people innovating and creating have to make a living. Large amounts of time and money can be spent on researching and developing new technologies and products without any guarantee that these will be rewarded, as there is always a risk that a product will not be successful. Intellectual property rights are a mechanism that allows innovators, creators and producers to finance their work through the market place. Other models of  financing exist, such as government funding or private patronage, but intellectual property rights  (IPRs) remain the basis most frequently used by individuals and organizations to fund and disseminate their work. Intellectual property rights allow creative freedom and encourage innovators and creators to be responsive to consumer needs.

But what happens when these rights are not able to save your creativity! The end result is that there is nothing that we can stop Intellectual property theft unless we stop ourselves from using pirated stuff! But then there’s another angle to it as well. We all have heard that “There is no such thing as free lunch in this world.” So whenever we get a chance to use FOKAT KA MAAL 😛 😛 nothing can stop us! Even I do the same and I’m sure all of us do the same! 😉

As an example, Five years and five months after it started probing the sensational theft of Rabindranath Tagore’s Nobel medallion and other memorabilia from Rabindra Bhavan museum at Visva Bharati University in Santiniketan, the CBI called off its investigation. In a letter to Registrar of the University Manimukut Mitra on August 20, the CBI SP (Special Crime Branch), Kolkata, said that it was closing the probe just because of a dearth of clues. Although this decesion of CBI was criticized a lot and it should be. After all Tagore was one of the greatest poets we had! 😡

Now lets take a look at the IT sphere. IT practitioners stand to lose from pirating of software in a number of ways. The first disadvantage is simply that this practice significantly contributes to the lack of appreciation for the true cost of computer software. For individuals wishing to become independent  software developers, this lack of appreciation ensures that the perceived value of computer software that they develop will generally be a fraction of the true value rendering software development a less than satisfactory economic and business pursuit. In the case of IT staff employed by public and private sector organisations, the value of the assets entrusted to their care is again not truly appreciated, and it seems not to be realised by those very IT practitioners that this lack of appreciation for the true cost of information systems impacts in a very real way on their careers.  Consider a typical medium sized organisation with a network of 30-40 machines running a standard set of applications, accounting, payroll, etc.

How businesses are affected?

Businesses are less likely to transfer advanced technology, or invest in production or R&D facilities in countries where they are likely to have their products copied or technology stolen. This is particularly true of industries where intellectual property plays a key role, such as the IT, biotechnology and pharmaceutical sectors, which many countries aspire to develop.In short, the economy stagnates.An analysis of international trade data suggests that up to $ 200 billion of internationally traded products could have been counterfeit or pirated in 2005. This amount is larger than the national GDPs of about 150 economies! The figure does not include non-tangible pirated digital products being distributed via the internet. If these items were added, says The Economic Impact of Counterfeiting and Piracy study published by the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development in 2007, “the total magnitude of counterfeiting and piracy worldwide could well be several hundred billion dollars more.” Now thats worth giving a thought to.

Please tell how the post is. Do share if you like it and additions are always welcome. 🙂

Innovation and creation have to be financed; like everyone else, the people innovating and creating
have to make a living. Large amounts of time and money can be spent on researching and developing
new technologies and products without any guarantee that these will be rewarded, as there is always a
risk that a product will not be successful. Intellectual property rights are a mechanism that allows
innovators, creators and producers to finance their work through the market place. Other models of
financing exist, such as government funding or private patronage, but intellectual property rights
(IPRs) remain the basis most frequently used by individuals and organizations to fund and disseminate
their work. Intellectual property rights allow creative freedom and encourage innovators and creators
to be responsive to consumer needs.
But what happens when these rights are not able to save your creativity! The end result is that there is
nothing that we can stop Intellectual property theft unless we stop ourselves from using pirated stuff!
But then there’s another angle to it as well. We all have heard that “There is no such thing as free
lunch in this world.” So whenever we get a chance to use FOKAT KA MAAL 😛 😛 nothing can stop us!
Even I do the same and I’m sure all of us do the same! 😉
As an example, Five years and five months after it started probing the sensational theft of
Rabindranath Tagore’s Nobel medallion and other memorabilia from Rabindra Bhavan museum at Visva
Bharati University in Santiniketan, the CBI called off its investigation. In a letter to Registrar of the
University Manimukut Mitra on August 20, the CBI SP (Special Crime Branch), Kolkata, said that it was
closing the probe just because of a dearth of clues. Although this decesion of CBI was criticized a lot
and it should be. After all Tagore was one of the greatest poets we had! 😡
Now lets take a look at the IT sphere. IT practitioners stand to lose from pirating of software in a
number of ways. The first disadvantage is simply that this practice significantly contributes to the lack
of appreciation for the true cost of computer software. For individuals wishing to become independent
software developers, this lack of appreciation ensures that the perceived value of computer software
that they develop will generally be a fraction of the true value rendering software development a less
than satisfactory economic and business pursuit. In the case of IT staff employed by public and private
sector organisations, the value of the assets entrusted to their care is again not truly appreciated, and
it seems not to be realised by those very IT practitioners that this lack of appreciation for the true cost
of information systems impacts in a very real way on their careers.  Consider a typical medium sized
organisation with a network of 30-40 machines running a standard set of applications, accounting,
payroll, etc.
How businesses are affected?
Businesses are less likely to transfer advanced technology, or invest in production or R&D facilities in
countries where they are likely to have their products copied or technology stolen. This is particularly
true of industries where intellectual property plays a key role, such as the IT, biotechnology and
pharmaceutical sectors, which many countries aspire to develop.In short, the economy stagnates.An
analysis of international trade data suggests that up to $ 200 billion of internationally traded products
could have been counterfeit or pirated in 2005. This amount is larger than the national GDPs of about
150 economies! The figure does not include non-tangible pirated digital products being distributed via
the internet. If these items were added, says The Economic Impact of Counterfeiting and Piracy study
published by the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development in 2007, “the total
magnitude of counterfeiting and piracy worldwide could well be several hundred billion dollars more.”
Now thats worth giving a thought to.
Please tell how the post is. Do share if you like it and additions are always welcome. :Innovation and creation have to be financed; like everyone else, the people innovating and creating
have to make a living. Large amounts of time and money can be spent on researching and developing
new technologies and products without any guarantee that these will be rewarded, as there is always a
risk that a product will not be successful. Intellectual property rights are a mechanism that allows
innovators, creators and producers to finance their work through the market place. Other models of
financing exist, such as government funding or private patronage, but intellectual property rights
(IPRs) remain the basis most frequently used by individuals and organizations to fund and disseminate
their work. Intellectual property rights allow creative freedom and encourage innovators and creators
to be responsive to consumer needs.
But what happens when these rights are not able to save your creativity! The end result is that there is
nothing that we can stop Intellectual property theft unless we stop ourselves from using pirated stuff!
But then there’s another angle to it as well. We all have heard that “There is no such thing as free
lunch in this world.” So whenever we get a chance to use FOKAT KA MAAL 😛 😛 nothing can stop us!
Even I do the same and I’m sure all of us do the same! 😉
As an example, Five years and five months after it started probing the sensational theft of
Rabindranath Tagore’s Nobel medallion and other memorabilia from Rabindra Bhavan museum at Visva
Bharati University in Santiniketan, the CBI called off its investigation. In a letter to Registrar of the
University Manimukut Mitra on August 20, the CBI SP (Special Crime Branch), Kolkata, said that it was
closing the probe just because of a dearth of clues. Although this decesion of CBI was criticized a lot
and it should be. After all Tagore was one of the greatest poets we had! 😡
Now lets take a look at the IT sphere. IT practitioners stand to lose from pirating of software in a
number of ways. The first disadvantage is simply that this practice significantly contributes to the lack
of appreciation for the true cost of computer software. For individuals wishing to become independent
software developers, this lack of appreciation ensures that the perceived value of computer software
that they develop will generally be a fraction of the true value rendering software development a less
than satisfactory economic and business pursuit. In the case of IT staff employed by public and private
sector organisations, the value of the assets entrusted to their care is again not truly appreciated, and
it seems not to be realised by those very IT practitioners that this lack of appreciation for the true cost
of information systems impacts in a very real way on their careers.  Consider a typical medium sized
organisation with a network of 30-40 machines running a standard set of applications, accounting,
payroll, etc.
How businesses are affected?
Businesses are less likely to transfer advanced technology, or invest in production or R&D facilities in
countries where they are likely to have their products copied or technology stolen. This is particularly
true of industries where intellectual property plays a key role, such as the IT, biotechnology and
pharmaceutical sectors, which many countries aspire to develop.In short, the economy stagnates.An
analysis of international trade data suggests that up to $ 200 billion of internationally traded products
could have been counterfeit or pirated in 2005. This amount is larger than the national GDPs of about
150 economies! The figure does not include non-tangible pirated digital products being distributed via
the internet. If these items were added, says The Economic Impact of Counterfeiting and Piracy study
published by the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development in 2007, “the total
magnitude of counterfeiting and piracy worldwide could well be several hundred billion dollars more.”
Now thats worth giving a thought to.
Please tell how the post is. Do share if you like it and additions are always welcome. 🙂
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15 Comments

Posted by on September 13, 2009 in Business, Concerns, Copyright, Economy, Federal Law

 

Tags: , , , , ,

15 responses to “Intellectual Property Theft : Chopping off Creativity

  1. Bharath

    September 13, 2009 at 9:20 PM

    Good one. Try on this lines. In India you have great chances to make a career in this.

    An unexplored area 🙂 all the best

     
    • Aditi

      September 13, 2009 at 10:59 PM

      Thank you. Hmm..Cyber security and all right. 🙂

       
  2. thenomad

    September 13, 2009 at 11:04 PM

    Good one but lemme point out that today, the focus on value has become extremely narrow. I would pay for my anti virus subscription but I maynot be ready to pay for winzip coz I just don’t think its worth the money. Yes, its good to use but I’m not sure if its worth all the $$$.

    As per the broader concept of IPR, today nobodyz gonna pay for content unless it is a genuine service, forget making money. It better be free or it better give the bang for the buck. So one should copy the best but execute it so well that you would reman in the pole position always…

    Just my 2 cents..

     
  3. Aditi

    September 13, 2009 at 11:12 PM

    Even I agree to it. I pay for my Antivirus but not because its not free but I think It is worth to pay for.

     
    • thenomad

      September 13, 2009 at 11:19 PM

      Precisely. If you take a closer look at the models on which GNU or Apache or for that matter any open source software is created, you would find that it is ‘value’ given away free of cost. And its quite surprising to see such applicatons being used in hardware as high end as blade servers or supercomputers (not the Cray series). Of course, they might end up using the software for a greater control but the very fact that Windows isn’t being used there is testimony enough to the fact that the best ones are not the paid ones after all. Piracy is going to remain rampant so long as prices don’t justify the usage.

       
      • Aditi

        September 13, 2009 at 11:45 PM

        Definitely! And that is why FOSS is a success!

         
  4. Paritosh

    September 13, 2009 at 11:15 PM

    Prime reason why piracy is growing is because of irrational pricing policy adopted by IT companies. And in a country like India where per capita is very low as compared to other countries, you cant expect to sell softwares at steep prices.

     
    • Aditi

      September 13, 2009 at 11:48 PM

      Yea but the companies still don’t understand this. Even small firms make softwares and quote a heavy price for it which again is of no value! I feel that there should be some regulatory body to decide the prices.

       
      • Paritosh

        September 14, 2009 at 12:02 AM

        Easy to say, difficult to implement. But efforts should be made. Else, piracy will continue.
        BTW, all the software that i use (expect for freeware n OS) are all pirated, so all IT officials reading this, dont be jackass n do something !

         
  5. aditipatel

    September 14, 2009 at 12:25 AM

    That was a deep thought. I absolutely agree with you.
    Nice one. Nicely written. 🙂

     
    • Aditi

      September 14, 2009 at 1:04 PM

      thanks. 🙂

       
  6. Toon India

    September 22, 2009 at 10:06 AM

    yup I agree some things are free because companies want people to use them, get used to them, and then charge a subscription, even the open source software aren’t insane to give everything free and not have a business model to generate revenues..yeah the revenue generation cycle could be long!!

    nice blog

     
    • Aditi

      September 22, 2009 at 2:13 PM

      Yea! Again. these things depends on what strategy the company follows.

       
  7. amarsrivastava

    October 3, 2009 at 2:47 AM

    Great Write Up, Aditi! From another perspective, I am reminded of UG Krishnamurti, who said about his work: “You are free to reproduce, distribute, interpret, misinterpret, distort, garble, do what you like, even claim authorship, without my consent or the permission of anybody.” (http://www.ugkrishnamurti.org/ug/copyright/index.html)

     
  8. Tirveni Yadav

    December 19, 2009 at 8:51 AM

    Hi Aditi,

    You write well.

    But IMHO there is no such thing as “Intellectual Property Right”.
    And I state my reasons below:

    {excerpts from Richard Stallman’s speech}:
    The term “intellectual property” is a catch-all. It lumps together completely disparate areas of law such as copyrights and patents, which are completely different. Every detail is different. It also lumps together trademarks which are even more different, and various other things more or less commonly encountered. None of them has anything in common with any of the others. Their origins historically are completely separate. The laws were designed independently. They covered different areas of life and activities. The public policy issues they raise are completely unrelated. Think about copyrights and then think about patents. Learn about copyright law and separately learn about patent law.

    To give you some of the biggest differences between copyrights and patents: Copyrights cover the details of expression of a work. Copyrights don’t cover any ideas. Patents only cover ideas and the use of ideas. Copyrights happen automatically. Patents are issued by a patent office in response to an application.

    Patents cost a lot of money. They cost even more paying the lawyers to write the application than they cost to actually apply. It takes typically some years for the application to get considered, even though patent offices do an extremely sloppy job of considering.
    4:05

    Copyrights last tremendously long. In some cases they can last as long as 150 years, where patents last 20 years, which is long enough that you can outlive them but still quite long by a timescale of a field such as software.

    Copyrights cover copying. If you write a novel that turns out to be word-for-word the same with Gone with the Wind and you can prove you never saw Gone with the Wind, that would be a defense to any accusation of copyright infringement.

    A patent is an absolute monopoly on using an idea. Even if you could prove you had the idea on your own, it would be entirely irrelevant if the idea is patented by somebody else.

     

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